Traditional recipes

Coney Chili Hot Dogs

Coney Chili Hot Dogs

Ingredients

  • 1 Pound lean ground beef
  • 1 can (8 ounces) tomato sauce
  • 1/2 Cup water
  • 1/4 Cup French's Classic Yellow Mustard
  • 1 package McCormick® Chili Seasoning Mix, Original
  • 1/4 Cup finely chopped white onion
  • 8 hot dogs
  • 8 hot dog rolls

Directions

Mix ground beef, tomato sauce, water, mustard and Seasoning Mix in large saucepan. Bring to boil on medium-high heat while stirring often with a whisk, spatula or potato masher to crumble meat to desired texture. Reduce heat to low; cover and simmer 5 to 10 minutes or until beef is no longer pink. Remove cover and simmer 15 minutes or until sauce has thickened.

Meanwhile, grill hot dogs as directed on package. Serve hot dogs in rolls topped with chili, chopped onions, and additional mustard, if desired.

Nutritional Facts

Servings8

Calories Per Serving413

Folate equivalent (total)82µg21%

Riboflavin (B2)0.3mg19.6%


Coney Island Chili Dogs

In Southeastern Michigan, “Coney Island” refers to 24-hour diners, and, the specific kind of chili-topped, grilled hot-dogs those diners serve. Invented in 1914 at a Jackson, Michigan joint called Todoroff’s Original Coney Island, the dogs–with their beanless, meaty chili (or “sauce” as it’s called in Michigan), were so popular, many other operators soon spun their own versions.

Dave Liske, the food historian behind the Flint Coney Resource site ( part of the Michigan Cuisine dot com), says Flint-style sauce–originally made with ground beef heart, was first developed by Macedonian restaurateur Simion (Sam) Petcieff Brayan in 1924 for his Flint’s Original Coney Island restaurant. Says Liske, “Brayan was the one who contracted with Koegel Meat Company to make the coney [hotdog] they still make today, also contracting with Abbott’s Meat company to make the sauce.” Abbott’s still makes Brayan’s 1919 sauce available to restaurants through Koegel.

Gillie’s Coney Island, a 1985-opened restaurant in Mt. Morris, MI, is a keeper of the Flint-style Coney flame. The restaurant shared a large-volume recipe for Flint-style Coney Island chili in a Michigan Restaurant Association cookbook more than 20 years ago. I’m publishing that recipe with their permission here, plus my own smaller-quantity, flavor-focused adaptation made with grapeseed oil instead of melted vegetable shortening, smoked Spanish paprika and granulated garlic. According to Liske, Gillie’s chili originally used beef heart, but switched to ground beef for the cookbook version, to make it easier for home cooks. The recipe comes very close to Brayan’s original.


Coney Island Chili Dogs

In Southeastern Michigan, “Coney Island” refers to 24-hour diners, and, the specific kind of chili-topped, grilled hot-dogs those diners serve. Invented in 1914 at a Jackson, Michigan joint called Todoroff’s Original Coney Island, the dogs–with their beanless, meaty chili (or “sauce” as it’s called in Michigan), were so popular, many other operators soon spun their own versions.

Dave Liske, the food historian behind the Flint Coney Resource site ( part of the Michigan Cuisine dot com), says Flint-style sauce–originally made with ground beef heart, was first developed by Macedonian restaurateur Simion (Sam) Petcieff Brayan in 1924 for his Flint’s Original Coney Island restaurant. Says Liske, “Brayan was the one who contracted with Koegel Meat Company to make the coney [hotdog] they still make today, also contracting with Abbott’s Meat company to make the sauce.” Abbott’s still makes Brayan’s 1919 sauce available to restaurants through Koegel.

Gillie’s Coney Island, a 1985-opened restaurant in Mt. Morris, MI, is a keeper of the Flint-style Coney flame. The restaurant shared a large-volume recipe for Flint-style Coney Island chili in a Michigan Restaurant Association cookbook more than 20 years ago. I’m publishing that recipe with their permission here, plus my own smaller-quantity, flavor-focused adaptation made with grapeseed oil instead of melted vegetable shortening, smoked Spanish paprika and granulated garlic. According to Liske, Gillie’s chili originally used beef heart, but switched to ground beef for the cookbook version, to make it easier for home cooks. The recipe comes very close to Brayan’s original.


Coney Island Chili Dogs

In Southeastern Michigan, “Coney Island” refers to 24-hour diners, and, the specific kind of chili-topped, grilled hot-dogs those diners serve. Invented in 1914 at a Jackson, Michigan joint called Todoroff’s Original Coney Island, the dogs–with their beanless, meaty chili (or “sauce” as it’s called in Michigan), were so popular, many other operators soon spun their own versions.

Dave Liske, the food historian behind the Flint Coney Resource site ( part of the Michigan Cuisine dot com), says Flint-style sauce–originally made with ground beef heart, was first developed by Macedonian restaurateur Simion (Sam) Petcieff Brayan in 1924 for his Flint’s Original Coney Island restaurant. Says Liske, “Brayan was the one who contracted with Koegel Meat Company to make the coney [hotdog] they still make today, also contracting with Abbott’s Meat company to make the sauce.” Abbott’s still makes Brayan’s 1919 sauce available to restaurants through Koegel.

Gillie’s Coney Island, a 1985-opened restaurant in Mt. Morris, MI, is a keeper of the Flint-style Coney flame. The restaurant shared a large-volume recipe for Flint-style Coney Island chili in a Michigan Restaurant Association cookbook more than 20 years ago. I’m publishing that recipe with their permission here, plus my own smaller-quantity, flavor-focused adaptation made with grapeseed oil instead of melted vegetable shortening, smoked Spanish paprika and granulated garlic. According to Liske, Gillie’s chili originally used beef heart, but switched to ground beef for the cookbook version, to make it easier for home cooks. The recipe comes very close to Brayan’s original.


Coney Island Chili Dogs

In Southeastern Michigan, “Coney Island” refers to 24-hour diners, and, the specific kind of chili-topped, grilled hot-dogs those diners serve. Invented in 1914 at a Jackson, Michigan joint called Todoroff’s Original Coney Island, the dogs–with their beanless, meaty chili (or “sauce” as it’s called in Michigan), were so popular, many other operators soon spun their own versions.

Dave Liske, the food historian behind the Flint Coney Resource site ( part of the Michigan Cuisine dot com), says Flint-style sauce–originally made with ground beef heart, was first developed by Macedonian restaurateur Simion (Sam) Petcieff Brayan in 1924 for his Flint’s Original Coney Island restaurant. Says Liske, “Brayan was the one who contracted with Koegel Meat Company to make the coney [hotdog] they still make today, also contracting with Abbott’s Meat company to make the sauce.” Abbott’s still makes Brayan’s 1919 sauce available to restaurants through Koegel.

Gillie’s Coney Island, a 1985-opened restaurant in Mt. Morris, MI, is a keeper of the Flint-style Coney flame. The restaurant shared a large-volume recipe for Flint-style Coney Island chili in a Michigan Restaurant Association cookbook more than 20 years ago. I’m publishing that recipe with their permission here, plus my own smaller-quantity, flavor-focused adaptation made with grapeseed oil instead of melted vegetable shortening, smoked Spanish paprika and granulated garlic. According to Liske, Gillie’s chili originally used beef heart, but switched to ground beef for the cookbook version, to make it easier for home cooks. The recipe comes very close to Brayan’s original.


Coney Island Chili Dogs

In Southeastern Michigan, “Coney Island” refers to 24-hour diners, and, the specific kind of chili-topped, grilled hot-dogs those diners serve. Invented in 1914 at a Jackson, Michigan joint called Todoroff’s Original Coney Island, the dogs–with their beanless, meaty chili (or “sauce” as it’s called in Michigan), were so popular, many other operators soon spun their own versions.

Dave Liske, the food historian behind the Flint Coney Resource site ( part of the Michigan Cuisine dot com), says Flint-style sauce–originally made with ground beef heart, was first developed by Macedonian restaurateur Simion (Sam) Petcieff Brayan in 1924 for his Flint’s Original Coney Island restaurant. Says Liske, “Brayan was the one who contracted with Koegel Meat Company to make the coney [hotdog] they still make today, also contracting with Abbott’s Meat company to make the sauce.” Abbott’s still makes Brayan’s 1919 sauce available to restaurants through Koegel.

Gillie’s Coney Island, a 1985-opened restaurant in Mt. Morris, MI, is a keeper of the Flint-style Coney flame. The restaurant shared a large-volume recipe for Flint-style Coney Island chili in a Michigan Restaurant Association cookbook more than 20 years ago. I’m publishing that recipe with their permission here, plus my own smaller-quantity, flavor-focused adaptation made with grapeseed oil instead of melted vegetable shortening, smoked Spanish paprika and granulated garlic. According to Liske, Gillie’s chili originally used beef heart, but switched to ground beef for the cookbook version, to make it easier for home cooks. The recipe comes very close to Brayan’s original.


Coney Island Chili Dogs

In Southeastern Michigan, “Coney Island” refers to 24-hour diners, and, the specific kind of chili-topped, grilled hot-dogs those diners serve. Invented in 1914 at a Jackson, Michigan joint called Todoroff’s Original Coney Island, the dogs–with their beanless, meaty chili (or “sauce” as it’s called in Michigan), were so popular, many other operators soon spun their own versions.

Dave Liske, the food historian behind the Flint Coney Resource site ( part of the Michigan Cuisine dot com), says Flint-style sauce–originally made with ground beef heart, was first developed by Macedonian restaurateur Simion (Sam) Petcieff Brayan in 1924 for his Flint’s Original Coney Island restaurant. Says Liske, “Brayan was the one who contracted with Koegel Meat Company to make the coney [hotdog] they still make today, also contracting with Abbott’s Meat company to make the sauce.” Abbott’s still makes Brayan’s 1919 sauce available to restaurants through Koegel.

Gillie’s Coney Island, a 1985-opened restaurant in Mt. Morris, MI, is a keeper of the Flint-style Coney flame. The restaurant shared a large-volume recipe for Flint-style Coney Island chili in a Michigan Restaurant Association cookbook more than 20 years ago. I’m publishing that recipe with their permission here, plus my own smaller-quantity, flavor-focused adaptation made with grapeseed oil instead of melted vegetable shortening, smoked Spanish paprika and granulated garlic. According to Liske, Gillie’s chili originally used beef heart, but switched to ground beef for the cookbook version, to make it easier for home cooks. The recipe comes very close to Brayan’s original.


Coney Island Chili Dogs

In Southeastern Michigan, “Coney Island” refers to 24-hour diners, and, the specific kind of chili-topped, grilled hot-dogs those diners serve. Invented in 1914 at a Jackson, Michigan joint called Todoroff’s Original Coney Island, the dogs–with their beanless, meaty chili (or “sauce” as it’s called in Michigan), were so popular, many other operators soon spun their own versions.

Dave Liske, the food historian behind the Flint Coney Resource site ( part of the Michigan Cuisine dot com), says Flint-style sauce–originally made with ground beef heart, was first developed by Macedonian restaurateur Simion (Sam) Petcieff Brayan in 1924 for his Flint’s Original Coney Island restaurant. Says Liske, “Brayan was the one who contracted with Koegel Meat Company to make the coney [hotdog] they still make today, also contracting with Abbott’s Meat company to make the sauce.” Abbott’s still makes Brayan’s 1919 sauce available to restaurants through Koegel.

Gillie’s Coney Island, a 1985-opened restaurant in Mt. Morris, MI, is a keeper of the Flint-style Coney flame. The restaurant shared a large-volume recipe for Flint-style Coney Island chili in a Michigan Restaurant Association cookbook more than 20 years ago. I’m publishing that recipe with their permission here, plus my own smaller-quantity, flavor-focused adaptation made with grapeseed oil instead of melted vegetable shortening, smoked Spanish paprika and granulated garlic. According to Liske, Gillie’s chili originally used beef heart, but switched to ground beef for the cookbook version, to make it easier for home cooks. The recipe comes very close to Brayan’s original.


Coney Island Chili Dogs

In Southeastern Michigan, “Coney Island” refers to 24-hour diners, and, the specific kind of chili-topped, grilled hot-dogs those diners serve. Invented in 1914 at a Jackson, Michigan joint called Todoroff’s Original Coney Island, the dogs–with their beanless, meaty chili (or “sauce” as it’s called in Michigan), were so popular, many other operators soon spun their own versions.

Dave Liske, the food historian behind the Flint Coney Resource site ( part of the Michigan Cuisine dot com), says Flint-style sauce–originally made with ground beef heart, was first developed by Macedonian restaurateur Simion (Sam) Petcieff Brayan in 1924 for his Flint’s Original Coney Island restaurant. Says Liske, “Brayan was the one who contracted with Koegel Meat Company to make the coney [hotdog] they still make today, also contracting with Abbott’s Meat company to make the sauce.” Abbott’s still makes Brayan’s 1919 sauce available to restaurants through Koegel.

Gillie’s Coney Island, a 1985-opened restaurant in Mt. Morris, MI, is a keeper of the Flint-style Coney flame. The restaurant shared a large-volume recipe for Flint-style Coney Island chili in a Michigan Restaurant Association cookbook more than 20 years ago. I’m publishing that recipe with their permission here, plus my own smaller-quantity, flavor-focused adaptation made with grapeseed oil instead of melted vegetable shortening, smoked Spanish paprika and granulated garlic. According to Liske, Gillie’s chili originally used beef heart, but switched to ground beef for the cookbook version, to make it easier for home cooks. The recipe comes very close to Brayan’s original.


Coney Island Chili Dogs

In Southeastern Michigan, “Coney Island” refers to 24-hour diners, and, the specific kind of chili-topped, grilled hot-dogs those diners serve. Invented in 1914 at a Jackson, Michigan joint called Todoroff’s Original Coney Island, the dogs–with their beanless, meaty chili (or “sauce” as it’s called in Michigan), were so popular, many other operators soon spun their own versions.

Dave Liske, the food historian behind the Flint Coney Resource site ( part of the Michigan Cuisine dot com), says Flint-style sauce–originally made with ground beef heart, was first developed by Macedonian restaurateur Simion (Sam) Petcieff Brayan in 1924 for his Flint’s Original Coney Island restaurant. Says Liske, “Brayan was the one who contracted with Koegel Meat Company to make the coney [hotdog] they still make today, also contracting with Abbott’s Meat company to make the sauce.” Abbott’s still makes Brayan’s 1919 sauce available to restaurants through Koegel.

Gillie’s Coney Island, a 1985-opened restaurant in Mt. Morris, MI, is a keeper of the Flint-style Coney flame. The restaurant shared a large-volume recipe for Flint-style Coney Island chili in a Michigan Restaurant Association cookbook more than 20 years ago. I’m publishing that recipe with their permission here, plus my own smaller-quantity, flavor-focused adaptation made with grapeseed oil instead of melted vegetable shortening, smoked Spanish paprika and granulated garlic. According to Liske, Gillie’s chili originally used beef heart, but switched to ground beef for the cookbook version, to make it easier for home cooks. The recipe comes very close to Brayan’s original.


Coney Island Chili Dogs

In Southeastern Michigan, “Coney Island” refers to 24-hour diners, and, the specific kind of chili-topped, grilled hot-dogs those diners serve. Invented in 1914 at a Jackson, Michigan joint called Todoroff’s Original Coney Island, the dogs–with their beanless, meaty chili (or “sauce” as it’s called in Michigan), were so popular, many other operators soon spun their own versions.

Dave Liske, the food historian behind the Flint Coney Resource site ( part of the Michigan Cuisine dot com), says Flint-style sauce–originally made with ground beef heart, was first developed by Macedonian restaurateur Simion (Sam) Petcieff Brayan in 1924 for his Flint’s Original Coney Island restaurant. Says Liske, “Brayan was the one who contracted with Koegel Meat Company to make the coney [hotdog] they still make today, also contracting with Abbott’s Meat company to make the sauce.” Abbott’s still makes Brayan’s 1919 sauce available to restaurants through Koegel.

Gillie’s Coney Island, a 1985-opened restaurant in Mt. Morris, MI, is a keeper of the Flint-style Coney flame. The restaurant shared a large-volume recipe for Flint-style Coney Island chili in a Michigan Restaurant Association cookbook more than 20 years ago. I’m publishing that recipe with their permission here, plus my own smaller-quantity, flavor-focused adaptation made with grapeseed oil instead of melted vegetable shortening, smoked Spanish paprika and granulated garlic. According to Liske, Gillie’s chili originally used beef heart, but switched to ground beef for the cookbook version, to make it easier for home cooks. The recipe comes very close to Brayan’s original.


Watch the video: COPYCAT Original Coney Island Hot Dog Meat Chili Sauce Recipe (January 2022).