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Foods You’ll Never Find at Whole Foods

Foods You’ll Never Find at Whole Foods

Want to buy these products? Better look elsewhere

Heinz ketchup contains high fructose corn syrup, which is on the “unacceptable ingredients” list.

Walking around your local outpost of Whole Foods, the Austin-based supermarket chain with nearly 400 locations in the U.S., U.K., and Canada, it’s pretty easy to tell that it’s not your everyday supermarket. Their offerings are quite different from what you’ll find at your local Safeway, and in fact there are more than 80 ingredients that the store considers to be “unacceptable,” and won’t allow in any of the products they sell.

Foods You’ll Never Find at Whole Foods (Slideshow)

Whole Foods has very high standards for what they’ll stock. Their seafood is sustainable, the meat is certified according to a five-step animal welfare rating, they’re working to remove all GMO foods from the shelves, and produce is organic whenever possible. But at Whole Foods, it’s not just about what they stock the shelves with, it’s about what they won’t stock the shelves with; and plenty of everyday ingredients are off-limits.

For example, a recent study found that 54 percent of the foods sold at Walmart stores would be considered unacceptable at Whole Foods, as would a whopping 97 percent of the soft drinks and sodas. And while the average supermarket sells essentially the same products at all of its locations, each Whole Foods purchases as many locally-produced products as possible, so the selection is slightly different at every store.

The company's roster of unacceptable ingredients is constantly updated, but for the most part, once an ingredient makes its way onto the list it’s unlikely to come off again. All Whole Foods products need to be as natural and organic as possible, and additives like disodium dihydrogen EDTA are about as unnatural as it gets. So read on to learn about 10 common foods and ingredients that you’ll never find at your local Whole Foods.

Artificial Flavors and Colors


Looking for your favorite candy bar? Odds are you won’t find it at Whole Foods, because just about all of them contain artificial flavors and colors.

Aspartame


This artificial sweetener is most commonly used in diet sodas, so don’t go looking for Diet Coke.

Click here for 8 more ingredients you'll never find at Whole Foods.


20 Foods That Could Help Lower Triglycerides

Chances are, you've heard that having healthy triglyceride levels in your blood is important. But what exactly are triglycerides, and how do they work in your body? And when you have high levels, is it possible to manage them with lifestyle, and can food make a difference? The good news is, according to food and health pros, what you eat can help. We've rounded up some of the foods that can lower triglycerides, and there are plenty of whole foods on the list.

What are triglycerides, and why are they important?

"Triglycerides are a type of blood lipid (or fat molecules) and they're made up of free fatty acids. They're stored in your body fat, but you'll also find them in your blood," says nutritionist Jessica Ash, CNC, HHC, FDN-P and founder of Jessica Ash Wellness. "And because your liver makes them, they're also found in your liver and then your tissues. Our body gets triglycerides either from the food that you eat or from the body [because] it manufactures triglycerides in the liver."

"It's important to know that triglycerides, like cholesterol, are normally protective (aka the body produces them as a protective mechanism in response to a "threat"). But triglycerides are used for energy, whereas cholesterol is used for steroid hormone production," Ash explains. "And our muscles are specifically what like to uptake fatty acids or triglycerides. So they're fatty acids that the body usually uses for energy."

Your body needs energy from food to function. But excess energy, especially from sources like simple carbohydrates, can be stored as triglycerides, which can create issues if your triglyceride levels are elevated above the normal range. According to the Mayo Clinic, if your triglycerides are over 150 mg/dL, then you're at a greater risk for developing heart disease.

What can you do to lower high triglyceride levels?

Because your body can get triglycerides from the food you eat, it makes sense that changing your diet can help if you're concerned with your triglyceride levels. In general, according to Ash, it's important to reduce your intake of refined flour, processed and packaged foods that contain trans fats, high fructose corn syrup, and excess carbs and sugars that are bad news for your health.

One key nutrient to keep in mind is fat. According to Ash, switching out the types of fat you eat can make a huge difference. "Trans fats and polyunsaturated fats, like the fat in canola oil, are going to be the biggest offenders because they burden the liver, which is going to manufacture more triglycerides in order to make more LDL. So what we're eating and how we're supporting the liver is really what's going to matter when it comes to triglycerides," she says.

That said, fat is only one factor to consider when it comes to food. "Specific to food, fat itself is often not the culprit," says registered dietitian Amanda Archibald, founder of The Genomic Kitchen. "Excess calories from alcohol or starchy/sugary foods are often more complicit in producing high triglycerides."

If your doctor has told you your triglyceride levels are on the high side, it's worth asking them what foods to avoid and what lifestyle changes could help. Chances are, you'll want to exercise more and go easy on trans fats and simple carbs.

What foods can help lower triglycerides?

Now that you know which foods to avoid, what foods can you add into your diet that can help support healthy triglyceride levels? "Foods to emphasize are high fiber vegetables with lower sugar content, such as cruciferous vegetables," Archibald says. "Including legumes, canned or cooked from their dried versions, will add both fiber and satiety to the plate."

Adding healthy omega-3 fats can be helpful as well. "Among fats, seek out foods rich in omega-3 fats, which not only act as natural anti-inflammatories in the body but can also prevent the production of triglycerides and (very low density) cholesterol in the liver," says Archibald.

Here are 20 foods that can lower triglycerides.


20 Foods That Could Help Lower Triglycerides

Chances are, you've heard that having healthy triglyceride levels in your blood is important. But what exactly are triglycerides, and how do they work in your body? And when you have high levels, is it possible to manage them with lifestyle, and can food make a difference? The good news is, according to food and health pros, what you eat can help. We've rounded up some of the foods that can lower triglycerides, and there are plenty of whole foods on the list.

What are triglycerides, and why are they important?

"Triglycerides are a type of blood lipid (or fat molecules) and they're made up of free fatty acids. They're stored in your body fat, but you'll also find them in your blood," says nutritionist Jessica Ash, CNC, HHC, FDN-P and founder of Jessica Ash Wellness. "And because your liver makes them, they're also found in your liver and then your tissues. Our body gets triglycerides either from the food that you eat or from the body [because] it manufactures triglycerides in the liver."

"It's important to know that triglycerides, like cholesterol, are normally protective (aka the body produces them as a protective mechanism in response to a "threat"). But triglycerides are used for energy, whereas cholesterol is used for steroid hormone production," Ash explains. "And our muscles are specifically what like to uptake fatty acids or triglycerides. So they're fatty acids that the body usually uses for energy."

Your body needs energy from food to function. But excess energy, especially from sources like simple carbohydrates, can be stored as triglycerides, which can create issues if your triglyceride levels are elevated above the normal range. According to the Mayo Clinic, if your triglycerides are over 150 mg/dL, then you're at a greater risk for developing heart disease.

What can you do to lower high triglyceride levels?

Because your body can get triglycerides from the food you eat, it makes sense that changing your diet can help if you're concerned with your triglyceride levels. In general, according to Ash, it's important to reduce your intake of refined flour, processed and packaged foods that contain trans fats, high fructose corn syrup, and excess carbs and sugars that are bad news for your health.

One key nutrient to keep in mind is fat. According to Ash, switching out the types of fat you eat can make a huge difference. "Trans fats and polyunsaturated fats, like the fat in canola oil, are going to be the biggest offenders because they burden the liver, which is going to manufacture more triglycerides in order to make more LDL. So what we're eating and how we're supporting the liver is really what's going to matter when it comes to triglycerides," she says.

That said, fat is only one factor to consider when it comes to food. "Specific to food, fat itself is often not the culprit," says registered dietitian Amanda Archibald, founder of The Genomic Kitchen. "Excess calories from alcohol or starchy/sugary foods are often more complicit in producing high triglycerides."

If your doctor has told you your triglyceride levels are on the high side, it's worth asking them what foods to avoid and what lifestyle changes could help. Chances are, you'll want to exercise more and go easy on trans fats and simple carbs.

What foods can help lower triglycerides?

Now that you know which foods to avoid, what foods can you add into your diet that can help support healthy triglyceride levels? "Foods to emphasize are high fiber vegetables with lower sugar content, such as cruciferous vegetables," Archibald says. "Including legumes, canned or cooked from their dried versions, will add both fiber and satiety to the plate."

Adding healthy omega-3 fats can be helpful as well. "Among fats, seek out foods rich in omega-3 fats, which not only act as natural anti-inflammatories in the body but can also prevent the production of triglycerides and (very low density) cholesterol in the liver," says Archibald.

Here are 20 foods that can lower triglycerides.


20 Foods That Could Help Lower Triglycerides

Chances are, you've heard that having healthy triglyceride levels in your blood is important. But what exactly are triglycerides, and how do they work in your body? And when you have high levels, is it possible to manage them with lifestyle, and can food make a difference? The good news is, according to food and health pros, what you eat can help. We've rounded up some of the foods that can lower triglycerides, and there are plenty of whole foods on the list.

What are triglycerides, and why are they important?

"Triglycerides are a type of blood lipid (or fat molecules) and they're made up of free fatty acids. They're stored in your body fat, but you'll also find them in your blood," says nutritionist Jessica Ash, CNC, HHC, FDN-P and founder of Jessica Ash Wellness. "And because your liver makes them, they're also found in your liver and then your tissues. Our body gets triglycerides either from the food that you eat or from the body [because] it manufactures triglycerides in the liver."

"It's important to know that triglycerides, like cholesterol, are normally protective (aka the body produces them as a protective mechanism in response to a "threat"). But triglycerides are used for energy, whereas cholesterol is used for steroid hormone production," Ash explains. "And our muscles are specifically what like to uptake fatty acids or triglycerides. So they're fatty acids that the body usually uses for energy."

Your body needs energy from food to function. But excess energy, especially from sources like simple carbohydrates, can be stored as triglycerides, which can create issues if your triglyceride levels are elevated above the normal range. According to the Mayo Clinic, if your triglycerides are over 150 mg/dL, then you're at a greater risk for developing heart disease.

What can you do to lower high triglyceride levels?

Because your body can get triglycerides from the food you eat, it makes sense that changing your diet can help if you're concerned with your triglyceride levels. In general, according to Ash, it's important to reduce your intake of refined flour, processed and packaged foods that contain trans fats, high fructose corn syrup, and excess carbs and sugars that are bad news for your health.

One key nutrient to keep in mind is fat. According to Ash, switching out the types of fat you eat can make a huge difference. "Trans fats and polyunsaturated fats, like the fat in canola oil, are going to be the biggest offenders because they burden the liver, which is going to manufacture more triglycerides in order to make more LDL. So what we're eating and how we're supporting the liver is really what's going to matter when it comes to triglycerides," she says.

That said, fat is only one factor to consider when it comes to food. "Specific to food, fat itself is often not the culprit," says registered dietitian Amanda Archibald, founder of The Genomic Kitchen. "Excess calories from alcohol or starchy/sugary foods are often more complicit in producing high triglycerides."

If your doctor has told you your triglyceride levels are on the high side, it's worth asking them what foods to avoid and what lifestyle changes could help. Chances are, you'll want to exercise more and go easy on trans fats and simple carbs.

What foods can help lower triglycerides?

Now that you know which foods to avoid, what foods can you add into your diet that can help support healthy triglyceride levels? "Foods to emphasize are high fiber vegetables with lower sugar content, such as cruciferous vegetables," Archibald says. "Including legumes, canned or cooked from their dried versions, will add both fiber and satiety to the plate."

Adding healthy omega-3 fats can be helpful as well. "Among fats, seek out foods rich in omega-3 fats, which not only act as natural anti-inflammatories in the body but can also prevent the production of triglycerides and (very low density) cholesterol in the liver," says Archibald.

Here are 20 foods that can lower triglycerides.


20 Foods That Could Help Lower Triglycerides

Chances are, you've heard that having healthy triglyceride levels in your blood is important. But what exactly are triglycerides, and how do they work in your body? And when you have high levels, is it possible to manage them with lifestyle, and can food make a difference? The good news is, according to food and health pros, what you eat can help. We've rounded up some of the foods that can lower triglycerides, and there are plenty of whole foods on the list.

What are triglycerides, and why are they important?

"Triglycerides are a type of blood lipid (or fat molecules) and they're made up of free fatty acids. They're stored in your body fat, but you'll also find them in your blood," says nutritionist Jessica Ash, CNC, HHC, FDN-P and founder of Jessica Ash Wellness. "And because your liver makes them, they're also found in your liver and then your tissues. Our body gets triglycerides either from the food that you eat or from the body [because] it manufactures triglycerides in the liver."

"It's important to know that triglycerides, like cholesterol, are normally protective (aka the body produces them as a protective mechanism in response to a "threat"). But triglycerides are used for energy, whereas cholesterol is used for steroid hormone production," Ash explains. "And our muscles are specifically what like to uptake fatty acids or triglycerides. So they're fatty acids that the body usually uses for energy."

Your body needs energy from food to function. But excess energy, especially from sources like simple carbohydrates, can be stored as triglycerides, which can create issues if your triglyceride levels are elevated above the normal range. According to the Mayo Clinic, if your triglycerides are over 150 mg/dL, then you're at a greater risk for developing heart disease.

What can you do to lower high triglyceride levels?

Because your body can get triglycerides from the food you eat, it makes sense that changing your diet can help if you're concerned with your triglyceride levels. In general, according to Ash, it's important to reduce your intake of refined flour, processed and packaged foods that contain trans fats, high fructose corn syrup, and excess carbs and sugars that are bad news for your health.

One key nutrient to keep in mind is fat. According to Ash, switching out the types of fat you eat can make a huge difference. "Trans fats and polyunsaturated fats, like the fat in canola oil, are going to be the biggest offenders because they burden the liver, which is going to manufacture more triglycerides in order to make more LDL. So what we're eating and how we're supporting the liver is really what's going to matter when it comes to triglycerides," she says.

That said, fat is only one factor to consider when it comes to food. "Specific to food, fat itself is often not the culprit," says registered dietitian Amanda Archibald, founder of The Genomic Kitchen. "Excess calories from alcohol or starchy/sugary foods are often more complicit in producing high triglycerides."

If your doctor has told you your triglyceride levels are on the high side, it's worth asking them what foods to avoid and what lifestyle changes could help. Chances are, you'll want to exercise more and go easy on trans fats and simple carbs.

What foods can help lower triglycerides?

Now that you know which foods to avoid, what foods can you add into your diet that can help support healthy triglyceride levels? "Foods to emphasize are high fiber vegetables with lower sugar content, such as cruciferous vegetables," Archibald says. "Including legumes, canned or cooked from their dried versions, will add both fiber and satiety to the plate."

Adding healthy omega-3 fats can be helpful as well. "Among fats, seek out foods rich in omega-3 fats, which not only act as natural anti-inflammatories in the body but can also prevent the production of triglycerides and (very low density) cholesterol in the liver," says Archibald.

Here are 20 foods that can lower triglycerides.


20 Foods That Could Help Lower Triglycerides

Chances are, you've heard that having healthy triglyceride levels in your blood is important. But what exactly are triglycerides, and how do they work in your body? And when you have high levels, is it possible to manage them with lifestyle, and can food make a difference? The good news is, according to food and health pros, what you eat can help. We've rounded up some of the foods that can lower triglycerides, and there are plenty of whole foods on the list.

What are triglycerides, and why are they important?

"Triglycerides are a type of blood lipid (or fat molecules) and they're made up of free fatty acids. They're stored in your body fat, but you'll also find them in your blood," says nutritionist Jessica Ash, CNC, HHC, FDN-P and founder of Jessica Ash Wellness. "And because your liver makes them, they're also found in your liver and then your tissues. Our body gets triglycerides either from the food that you eat or from the body [because] it manufactures triglycerides in the liver."

"It's important to know that triglycerides, like cholesterol, are normally protective (aka the body produces them as a protective mechanism in response to a "threat"). But triglycerides are used for energy, whereas cholesterol is used for steroid hormone production," Ash explains. "And our muscles are specifically what like to uptake fatty acids or triglycerides. So they're fatty acids that the body usually uses for energy."

Your body needs energy from food to function. But excess energy, especially from sources like simple carbohydrates, can be stored as triglycerides, which can create issues if your triglyceride levels are elevated above the normal range. According to the Mayo Clinic, if your triglycerides are over 150 mg/dL, then you're at a greater risk for developing heart disease.

What can you do to lower high triglyceride levels?

Because your body can get triglycerides from the food you eat, it makes sense that changing your diet can help if you're concerned with your triglyceride levels. In general, according to Ash, it's important to reduce your intake of refined flour, processed and packaged foods that contain trans fats, high fructose corn syrup, and excess carbs and sugars that are bad news for your health.

One key nutrient to keep in mind is fat. According to Ash, switching out the types of fat you eat can make a huge difference. "Trans fats and polyunsaturated fats, like the fat in canola oil, are going to be the biggest offenders because they burden the liver, which is going to manufacture more triglycerides in order to make more LDL. So what we're eating and how we're supporting the liver is really what's going to matter when it comes to triglycerides," she says.

That said, fat is only one factor to consider when it comes to food. "Specific to food, fat itself is often not the culprit," says registered dietitian Amanda Archibald, founder of The Genomic Kitchen. "Excess calories from alcohol or starchy/sugary foods are often more complicit in producing high triglycerides."

If your doctor has told you your triglyceride levels are on the high side, it's worth asking them what foods to avoid and what lifestyle changes could help. Chances are, you'll want to exercise more and go easy on trans fats and simple carbs.

What foods can help lower triglycerides?

Now that you know which foods to avoid, what foods can you add into your diet that can help support healthy triglyceride levels? "Foods to emphasize are high fiber vegetables with lower sugar content, such as cruciferous vegetables," Archibald says. "Including legumes, canned or cooked from their dried versions, will add both fiber and satiety to the plate."

Adding healthy omega-3 fats can be helpful as well. "Among fats, seek out foods rich in omega-3 fats, which not only act as natural anti-inflammatories in the body but can also prevent the production of triglycerides and (very low density) cholesterol in the liver," says Archibald.

Here are 20 foods that can lower triglycerides.


20 Foods That Could Help Lower Triglycerides

Chances are, you've heard that having healthy triglyceride levels in your blood is important. But what exactly are triglycerides, and how do they work in your body? And when you have high levels, is it possible to manage them with lifestyle, and can food make a difference? The good news is, according to food and health pros, what you eat can help. We've rounded up some of the foods that can lower triglycerides, and there are plenty of whole foods on the list.

What are triglycerides, and why are they important?

"Triglycerides are a type of blood lipid (or fat molecules) and they're made up of free fatty acids. They're stored in your body fat, but you'll also find them in your blood," says nutritionist Jessica Ash, CNC, HHC, FDN-P and founder of Jessica Ash Wellness. "And because your liver makes them, they're also found in your liver and then your tissues. Our body gets triglycerides either from the food that you eat or from the body [because] it manufactures triglycerides in the liver."

"It's important to know that triglycerides, like cholesterol, are normally protective (aka the body produces them as a protective mechanism in response to a "threat"). But triglycerides are used for energy, whereas cholesterol is used for steroid hormone production," Ash explains. "And our muscles are specifically what like to uptake fatty acids or triglycerides. So they're fatty acids that the body usually uses for energy."

Your body needs energy from food to function. But excess energy, especially from sources like simple carbohydrates, can be stored as triglycerides, which can create issues if your triglyceride levels are elevated above the normal range. According to the Mayo Clinic, if your triglycerides are over 150 mg/dL, then you're at a greater risk for developing heart disease.

What can you do to lower high triglyceride levels?

Because your body can get triglycerides from the food you eat, it makes sense that changing your diet can help if you're concerned with your triglyceride levels. In general, according to Ash, it's important to reduce your intake of refined flour, processed and packaged foods that contain trans fats, high fructose corn syrup, and excess carbs and sugars that are bad news for your health.

One key nutrient to keep in mind is fat. According to Ash, switching out the types of fat you eat can make a huge difference. "Trans fats and polyunsaturated fats, like the fat in canola oil, are going to be the biggest offenders because they burden the liver, which is going to manufacture more triglycerides in order to make more LDL. So what we're eating and how we're supporting the liver is really what's going to matter when it comes to triglycerides," she says.

That said, fat is only one factor to consider when it comes to food. "Specific to food, fat itself is often not the culprit," says registered dietitian Amanda Archibald, founder of The Genomic Kitchen. "Excess calories from alcohol or starchy/sugary foods are often more complicit in producing high triglycerides."

If your doctor has told you your triglyceride levels are on the high side, it's worth asking them what foods to avoid and what lifestyle changes could help. Chances are, you'll want to exercise more and go easy on trans fats and simple carbs.

What foods can help lower triglycerides?

Now that you know which foods to avoid, what foods can you add into your diet that can help support healthy triglyceride levels? "Foods to emphasize are high fiber vegetables with lower sugar content, such as cruciferous vegetables," Archibald says. "Including legumes, canned or cooked from their dried versions, will add both fiber and satiety to the plate."

Adding healthy omega-3 fats can be helpful as well. "Among fats, seek out foods rich in omega-3 fats, which not only act as natural anti-inflammatories in the body but can also prevent the production of triglycerides and (very low density) cholesterol in the liver," says Archibald.

Here are 20 foods that can lower triglycerides.


20 Foods That Could Help Lower Triglycerides

Chances are, you've heard that having healthy triglyceride levels in your blood is important. But what exactly are triglycerides, and how do they work in your body? And when you have high levels, is it possible to manage them with lifestyle, and can food make a difference? The good news is, according to food and health pros, what you eat can help. We've rounded up some of the foods that can lower triglycerides, and there are plenty of whole foods on the list.

What are triglycerides, and why are they important?

"Triglycerides are a type of blood lipid (or fat molecules) and they're made up of free fatty acids. They're stored in your body fat, but you'll also find them in your blood," says nutritionist Jessica Ash, CNC, HHC, FDN-P and founder of Jessica Ash Wellness. "And because your liver makes them, they're also found in your liver and then your tissues. Our body gets triglycerides either from the food that you eat or from the body [because] it manufactures triglycerides in the liver."

"It's important to know that triglycerides, like cholesterol, are normally protective (aka the body produces them as a protective mechanism in response to a "threat"). But triglycerides are used for energy, whereas cholesterol is used for steroid hormone production," Ash explains. "And our muscles are specifically what like to uptake fatty acids or triglycerides. So they're fatty acids that the body usually uses for energy."

Your body needs energy from food to function. But excess energy, especially from sources like simple carbohydrates, can be stored as triglycerides, which can create issues if your triglyceride levels are elevated above the normal range. According to the Mayo Clinic, if your triglycerides are over 150 mg/dL, then you're at a greater risk for developing heart disease.

What can you do to lower high triglyceride levels?

Because your body can get triglycerides from the food you eat, it makes sense that changing your diet can help if you're concerned with your triglyceride levels. In general, according to Ash, it's important to reduce your intake of refined flour, processed and packaged foods that contain trans fats, high fructose corn syrup, and excess carbs and sugars that are bad news for your health.

One key nutrient to keep in mind is fat. According to Ash, switching out the types of fat you eat can make a huge difference. "Trans fats and polyunsaturated fats, like the fat in canola oil, are going to be the biggest offenders because they burden the liver, which is going to manufacture more triglycerides in order to make more LDL. So what we're eating and how we're supporting the liver is really what's going to matter when it comes to triglycerides," she says.

That said, fat is only one factor to consider when it comes to food. "Specific to food, fat itself is often not the culprit," says registered dietitian Amanda Archibald, founder of The Genomic Kitchen. "Excess calories from alcohol or starchy/sugary foods are often more complicit in producing high triglycerides."

If your doctor has told you your triglyceride levels are on the high side, it's worth asking them what foods to avoid and what lifestyle changes could help. Chances are, you'll want to exercise more and go easy on trans fats and simple carbs.

What foods can help lower triglycerides?

Now that you know which foods to avoid, what foods can you add into your diet that can help support healthy triglyceride levels? "Foods to emphasize are high fiber vegetables with lower sugar content, such as cruciferous vegetables," Archibald says. "Including legumes, canned or cooked from their dried versions, will add both fiber and satiety to the plate."

Adding healthy omega-3 fats can be helpful as well. "Among fats, seek out foods rich in omega-3 fats, which not only act as natural anti-inflammatories in the body but can also prevent the production of triglycerides and (very low density) cholesterol in the liver," says Archibald.

Here are 20 foods that can lower triglycerides.


20 Foods That Could Help Lower Triglycerides

Chances are, you've heard that having healthy triglyceride levels in your blood is important. But what exactly are triglycerides, and how do they work in your body? And when you have high levels, is it possible to manage them with lifestyle, and can food make a difference? The good news is, according to food and health pros, what you eat can help. We've rounded up some of the foods that can lower triglycerides, and there are plenty of whole foods on the list.

What are triglycerides, and why are they important?

"Triglycerides are a type of blood lipid (or fat molecules) and they're made up of free fatty acids. They're stored in your body fat, but you'll also find them in your blood," says nutritionist Jessica Ash, CNC, HHC, FDN-P and founder of Jessica Ash Wellness. "And because your liver makes them, they're also found in your liver and then your tissues. Our body gets triglycerides either from the food that you eat or from the body [because] it manufactures triglycerides in the liver."

"It's important to know that triglycerides, like cholesterol, are normally protective (aka the body produces them as a protective mechanism in response to a "threat"). But triglycerides are used for energy, whereas cholesterol is used for steroid hormone production," Ash explains. "And our muscles are specifically what like to uptake fatty acids or triglycerides. So they're fatty acids that the body usually uses for energy."

Your body needs energy from food to function. But excess energy, especially from sources like simple carbohydrates, can be stored as triglycerides, which can create issues if your triglyceride levels are elevated above the normal range. According to the Mayo Clinic, if your triglycerides are over 150 mg/dL, then you're at a greater risk for developing heart disease.

What can you do to lower high triglyceride levels?

Because your body can get triglycerides from the food you eat, it makes sense that changing your diet can help if you're concerned with your triglyceride levels. In general, according to Ash, it's important to reduce your intake of refined flour, processed and packaged foods that contain trans fats, high fructose corn syrup, and excess carbs and sugars that are bad news for your health.

One key nutrient to keep in mind is fat. According to Ash, switching out the types of fat you eat can make a huge difference. "Trans fats and polyunsaturated fats, like the fat in canola oil, are going to be the biggest offenders because they burden the liver, which is going to manufacture more triglycerides in order to make more LDL. So what we're eating and how we're supporting the liver is really what's going to matter when it comes to triglycerides," she says.

That said, fat is only one factor to consider when it comes to food. "Specific to food, fat itself is often not the culprit," says registered dietitian Amanda Archibald, founder of The Genomic Kitchen. "Excess calories from alcohol or starchy/sugary foods are often more complicit in producing high triglycerides."

If your doctor has told you your triglyceride levels are on the high side, it's worth asking them what foods to avoid and what lifestyle changes could help. Chances are, you'll want to exercise more and go easy on trans fats and simple carbs.

What foods can help lower triglycerides?

Now that you know which foods to avoid, what foods can you add into your diet that can help support healthy triglyceride levels? "Foods to emphasize are high fiber vegetables with lower sugar content, such as cruciferous vegetables," Archibald says. "Including legumes, canned or cooked from their dried versions, will add both fiber and satiety to the plate."

Adding healthy omega-3 fats can be helpful as well. "Among fats, seek out foods rich in omega-3 fats, which not only act as natural anti-inflammatories in the body but can also prevent the production of triglycerides and (very low density) cholesterol in the liver," says Archibald.

Here are 20 foods that can lower triglycerides.


20 Foods That Could Help Lower Triglycerides

Chances are, you've heard that having healthy triglyceride levels in your blood is important. But what exactly are triglycerides, and how do they work in your body? And when you have high levels, is it possible to manage them with lifestyle, and can food make a difference? The good news is, according to food and health pros, what you eat can help. We've rounded up some of the foods that can lower triglycerides, and there are plenty of whole foods on the list.

What are triglycerides, and why are they important?

"Triglycerides are a type of blood lipid (or fat molecules) and they're made up of free fatty acids. They're stored in your body fat, but you'll also find them in your blood," says nutritionist Jessica Ash, CNC, HHC, FDN-P and founder of Jessica Ash Wellness. "And because your liver makes them, they're also found in your liver and then your tissues. Our body gets triglycerides either from the food that you eat or from the body [because] it manufactures triglycerides in the liver."

"It's important to know that triglycerides, like cholesterol, are normally protective (aka the body produces them as a protective mechanism in response to a "threat"). But triglycerides are used for energy, whereas cholesterol is used for steroid hormone production," Ash explains. "And our muscles are specifically what like to uptake fatty acids or triglycerides. So they're fatty acids that the body usually uses for energy."

Your body needs energy from food to function. But excess energy, especially from sources like simple carbohydrates, can be stored as triglycerides, which can create issues if your triglyceride levels are elevated above the normal range. According to the Mayo Clinic, if your triglycerides are over 150 mg/dL, then you're at a greater risk for developing heart disease.

What can you do to lower high triglyceride levels?

Because your body can get triglycerides from the food you eat, it makes sense that changing your diet can help if you're concerned with your triglyceride levels. In general, according to Ash, it's important to reduce your intake of refined flour, processed and packaged foods that contain trans fats, high fructose corn syrup, and excess carbs and sugars that are bad news for your health.

One key nutrient to keep in mind is fat. According to Ash, switching out the types of fat you eat can make a huge difference. "Trans fats and polyunsaturated fats, like the fat in canola oil, are going to be the biggest offenders because they burden the liver, which is going to manufacture more triglycerides in order to make more LDL. So what we're eating and how we're supporting the liver is really what's going to matter when it comes to triglycerides," she says.

That said, fat is only one factor to consider when it comes to food. "Specific to food, fat itself is often not the culprit," says registered dietitian Amanda Archibald, founder of The Genomic Kitchen. "Excess calories from alcohol or starchy/sugary foods are often more complicit in producing high triglycerides."

If your doctor has told you your triglyceride levels are on the high side, it's worth asking them what foods to avoid and what lifestyle changes could help. Chances are, you'll want to exercise more and go easy on trans fats and simple carbs.

What foods can help lower triglycerides?

Now that you know which foods to avoid, what foods can you add into your diet that can help support healthy triglyceride levels? "Foods to emphasize are high fiber vegetables with lower sugar content, such as cruciferous vegetables," Archibald says. "Including legumes, canned or cooked from their dried versions, will add both fiber and satiety to the plate."

Adding healthy omega-3 fats can be helpful as well. "Among fats, seek out foods rich in omega-3 fats, which not only act as natural anti-inflammatories in the body but can also prevent the production of triglycerides and (very low density) cholesterol in the liver," says Archibald.

Here are 20 foods that can lower triglycerides.


20 Foods That Could Help Lower Triglycerides

Chances are, you've heard that having healthy triglyceride levels in your blood is important. But what exactly are triglycerides, and how do they work in your body? And when you have high levels, is it possible to manage them with lifestyle, and can food make a difference? The good news is, according to food and health pros, what you eat can help. We've rounded up some of the foods that can lower triglycerides, and there are plenty of whole foods on the list.

What are triglycerides, and why are they important?

"Triglycerides are a type of blood lipid (or fat molecules) and they're made up of free fatty acids. They're stored in your body fat, but you'll also find them in your blood," says nutritionist Jessica Ash, CNC, HHC, FDN-P and founder of Jessica Ash Wellness. "And because your liver makes them, they're also found in your liver and then your tissues. Our body gets triglycerides either from the food that you eat or from the body [because] it manufactures triglycerides in the liver."

"It's important to know that triglycerides, like cholesterol, are normally protective (aka the body produces them as a protective mechanism in response to a "threat"). But triglycerides are used for energy, whereas cholesterol is used for steroid hormone production," Ash explains. "And our muscles are specifically what like to uptake fatty acids or triglycerides. So they're fatty acids that the body usually uses for energy."

Your body needs energy from food to function. But excess energy, especially from sources like simple carbohydrates, can be stored as triglycerides, which can create issues if your triglyceride levels are elevated above the normal range. According to the Mayo Clinic, if your triglycerides are over 150 mg/dL, then you're at a greater risk for developing heart disease.

What can you do to lower high triglyceride levels?

Because your body can get triglycerides from the food you eat, it makes sense that changing your diet can help if you're concerned with your triglyceride levels. In general, according to Ash, it's important to reduce your intake of refined flour, processed and packaged foods that contain trans fats, high fructose corn syrup, and excess carbs and sugars that are bad news for your health.

One key nutrient to keep in mind is fat. According to Ash, switching out the types of fat you eat can make a huge difference. "Trans fats and polyunsaturated fats, like the fat in canola oil, are going to be the biggest offenders because they burden the liver, which is going to manufacture more triglycerides in order to make more LDL. So what we're eating and how we're supporting the liver is really what's going to matter when it comes to triglycerides," she says.

That said, fat is only one factor to consider when it comes to food. "Specific to food, fat itself is often not the culprit," says registered dietitian Amanda Archibald, founder of The Genomic Kitchen. "Excess calories from alcohol or starchy/sugary foods are often more complicit in producing high triglycerides."

If your doctor has told you your triglyceride levels are on the high side, it's worth asking them what foods to avoid and what lifestyle changes could help. Chances are, you'll want to exercise more and go easy on trans fats and simple carbs.

What foods can help lower triglycerides?

Now that you know which foods to avoid, what foods can you add into your diet that can help support healthy triglyceride levels? "Foods to emphasize are high fiber vegetables with lower sugar content, such as cruciferous vegetables," Archibald says. "Including legumes, canned or cooked from their dried versions, will add both fiber and satiety to the plate."

Adding healthy omega-3 fats can be helpful as well. "Among fats, seek out foods rich in omega-3 fats, which not only act as natural anti-inflammatories in the body but can also prevent the production of triglycerides and (very low density) cholesterol in the liver," says Archibald.

Here are 20 foods that can lower triglycerides.